Results tagged “photography”

Projects - Planning

It is becoming apparent to me that, as I shoot more of the new Doorways to the West Project, I find more to shoot, which leads to the next question , how big will this project get, what form will it ultimately take?

As I review and edit, the numbers change; usually down, and I have currently 30+ images suitable I feel for printing and exhibiting, this will grow as I scout other nearby areas for more imagery.

Flaked

10 Bellvue Crescent, Preston

10 Bell Vue Crescent Preston on Twitpic

I was here.

Maps, Mapping and Place

From the map below you can see, that the corridor of images, that flickr deems the most interesting forms a relativley narrow corridor, running roughly East to West. No surprises really here, as these are the places I spend the most time at, home and work. I does give me an pointer that maybe I need to exapnd my explorations and see what I can come up with, Brusnwick for example, a suburb north of the CBD, is a rich area of post-industrial sites, in varying states of use.

I think it is quite apparent that my 'place' is in this East West corridor.

map of intersting
Uploaded with plasq's Skitch!

Michael; Son of Ansel; Adams

Today I discovered that Ansel Adams has a son, here is a video interview with him, he has lived an interesting life, though photography does not seem to feature heavily in it.

1 Year Ago....

Melbourne Victoria Australia 2009:03:20 20:06:09

AIPAD - News/Events

The list of show I want to see grows!

Frederick Sommer at Bruce Silverstein

Best known as a photographer, Sommer (1905-99) never restricted himself to one medium, and this sprawling, museum-quality survey shows how closely his photography, drawing, painting, and collage work were linked.

Frederick Sommer, Untitled, 1991, © Frederick and Frances Sommer Foundation, Courtesy Bruce Silverstein Gallery, NY
The photographs cover a lot of ground: desert landscapes, portraits, and nudes, pictures of cut-paper constructions, found-object assemblages, and Dubuffet-style abstractions conjured from smoke on glass or paint on cellophane. Hung alongside spidery drawings or more fluid, densely worked paintings, a wall of these images could spark enough energy to power the gallery. Collages of anatomical etchings underline the physicality and continue Sommer's focus on decay and mortality.

From The New Yorker.

[From AIPAD - News/Events]

Melbourne Silver Mine Blog

I was asked recently by barb, from the Melbourne Silver Mine to answer a few questions. The answers are now posted on their blog, check it out, thanks again to barb and the Melbourne Silver Mine for the opportunity.

An essay from, AMERICANSUBURB X

[From "Perfect Uncertainty - Robert Adams and the American West (2002)"]

My admiration of Mr. Adams is well known by those who know me well enough, this essay I stumbled upon on AMERICANSUBURB X is yet another glimpse at Mr Adams creative output adding to the already impressive body of written work about him that exists. It is just a pity it took me 8 years to find this one. Something that I've now come to take for granted is the speed and frequency of readily available information out there on my favourite subject Art Photography. Obviously this wasn't the case in 2002.

I bought a new camera

I was disappointed, that I missed, buying the Canon G10 in 2008, I hunted high and low for it in late 2009, to no avail. I purchased the G11 early this year and, I'm much happier anyway. Noise levels are reduced in this model, according to the specs and the banter on forums like dpreview.com

[From Canon Camera Museum | Camera Hall - Digital Compact Cameras]

Unfortunately due to the awful lighting conditions this time of year, I've not been able to shoot a great deal, to really get some results from it.

Interesting too, note that Canon, list it in the “Museum;” already?

A New Year; a New Change?

2009 back catalogue
Uploaded with plasq's Skitch!

This is a screen grab from iView Media Pro, it shows I have 108 images from 2009, queued up for upload,to flickr. My 2008 file has 34 also awaiting upload to flickr. Making a total of 142 images. Based on a loose regime of 3 images uploaded a week I have 47 weeks worth of images to upload. This is only counting my phone-camera, there are a few from my Nikon Coolpix 3700 and my Vistaquest to upload as well.

As I head into my 5th year of using flickr, looking back things have changed, changed dramatically. When I first started using flickr, I would upload almost daily, and spend innumerable hours connecting with all the other great people I'd 'meet'. Now, I have to remember to upload and some weeks it takes me so long to pick, which images to add, to keep the flow happening in my stream, I give up and leave it for a few days. Fortunately the altfotonet group still has some outstanding stuff, as does several others, where some cross posting occurs. Other changes to my online activity come from external sources like twitter and facebook. Now if I could just find a way to get paid for all my online activity?

Some Great news for the festival created by Jeff Moorfoot

The Ballarat International Foto Biennale [BIFB] has just been accepted for membership into the Festival de la Luz or Festival of Light [FOL], a grouping of 32 festivals of photography worldwide, including some of the biggest and most important similar events on 5 continents. The announcement was made in Buenos Aires by FOL Director and Director General of the Argentina Festival ‘Enceuntros Abiertos’ Ms Elda Harrington.
Ballarat is the first Australian photography festival to be accepted as a member festival, following the hugely successful BIFB’09 in September, and membership gives recognition to the impact that such a young festival has already made on the international photography stage. The application for Ballarat to join was proposed by BIFB board member Senga Peckham at the FOL directors meeting in Paris in November, and was considered along with applications by festivals from Luxembourg and Turin by the directors of 15 festivals which make up the FOL executive. The BIFB received a unanimous 15 votes for admission while Luxembourg was also accepted as a new member with 13 votes.

[From BALLARAT PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL JOINS WORLD GROUP @ free radical]

Read more

Larry Sultan, California Photographer, Dies at 63
By RANDY KENNEDY
Published: December 14, 2009
Larry Sultan, a highly influential California photographer whose 1977 collaboration, “Evidence” — a book made up solely of pictures culled from vast industrial and government archives — became a watershed in the history of art photography, died on Sunday at his home in Greenbrae, Calif. He was 63.

[read on Larry Sultan, California Photographer, Dies at 63 - Obituary (Obit) - NYTimes.com]

I have to admit, I've not seen much of Mr. Sultan's work, but the little I had has stuck in my mind, another book to add to my collection I guess.

Film V Digital

Thanks to Nettsu a contact on twitter, I was pointed to this article about the benefits of film. It is a good read and given my own background in film photography, made plenty of sense.

Way back in 2003 I wrote an article on the issue of film versus digital. Back then cameras, where prohibitively expensive, and digital storage was far more expensive than it is today. Photoshop of course, was the, mostly widely used application used to open and edit photographs on a computer, in some cases the only application. RAW files were yet to be part of the mainstream.

Raw files and new applications for sorting and editing photographs aside things haven't changed that much. Making a good image still requires a modicum of understanding about, lenses, light, at the minimum, making a print either digitally or via analogue requires it's own skill set, making a body of work, requires another skill-set, that has no bearing on technique or the ability to understand how your camera works. Making prints and using cameras are skills with a plethora of manuals [10,723 Results on Amazon today alone] available to anyone with enough interest in the medium to buy a handful of books and get access to the machinery to do this. Creating a body of work can often be done in isolation, or done in a more formal manner through training in a fine art degree program. Learning to 'pre-visualise in photography can be both learnt and taught, but is I feel the most difficult part of the process to really master.

Many of the points alluded to in the article above by Ken Rockwell, assume you have mastered the craft of photography, something that can be quite expensive to learn as a beginner in photography, and this is where digital shines over film, I feel. Making mistakes is the quickest and easiest way to learn the basics of exposure and composition. Making mistakes with film, on the other hand can cost a lot of time and wasted effort, if you haven't already mastered your camera craft. Finally the biggest issue I had with Mr Rockwell's article, was he seemed to sometimes refer to colour neg and other times colour slide, or positive film, two films with vastly different exposure latitudes, and some of his points were invalid if you used negative film as reading a colour neg over a light box, requires considerably more skill and knowledge than a slide film, which is simply a positive of the scene as taken.

So, here's a new table of the pros and cons of digital over film, based on my own experience of teaching camera craft, and using a variety of film cameras since the early 1980's, and digital cameras since the mid to late 1990's.

I do however agree that digitial has it's place in industries like catalogue photography fashion, and photo-journalism.

Pros and Cons of Digital and Analog Photography
Digital Pros Cons
  Speed. May mean practicioners, will shooot 'by the pound' and add to a future worload of sorting.
  Ease of Use Storage mediums can be a problem, as technologies upgrade
  Limitless copying. Manipulation Applications don't allow an under the hood approach to most users, compared to film developer and paper developers.
  Instant feedback. Can be distracting as it will draw your attention away from what is going on around you, meaning less possible opportunities, photographically.
  Storage space for images/files. Ease of deletion could mean a loss of cultural history, or just an overwhelming amount of bad photographs, anecdotally 3,000 images a minute are uploaded to flickr alone.
  Democratic process, can be easy to learn. Small to non existent history of published texts
  Only requires a desk and electricity, no special room. Storage types and Mediums change making large archives difficult to manage, you must have electricity.
  No ongoing film costs. Sorting and archiving of files requires all manner of software and tools to operate
  Camera Prices drop exceptionally every two years or so. Hardware and software requirements may mean constant upgrades.
    Location shooting requires hardware to process, archive and sort. Adding considerably overall weight of a camera/travel bag, and to time and cost involved in 'editing', batteries must allways be charged and ready, spare batteries for cameras a must, if you are a prolific shooter.
  Raw files allow more exposure options, thereby enabling richer fuller print. Raw formats at the date of writing are a moving target, some software, photoshop for example needs to be kept up to date to open and process these files, from recent cameras.
     
Analog Pros Cons
  Easy to learn Can be hard to master
  Comparatively cheap basic/starter equipment Mastering of technique often requires and 'apprenticeship' of sorts
  Processes can tinkered under the hood easily, long history of published texts Storage of film and prints requires physical space.
  Simple to control {once mastered} Unexposed materials require special handling, refrigeration/darkroom
  No loss if treated with the right approach to entire process Losse are uneditibale if too extreme.
  Film has better exposure latitude than CCD especially negative films Calibration maybe required to really understand what is going on.
  Older film Cameras, were made to last many years, many require no batteries thereby lowering the load of the photographer 'on location' Film needs to be stored correctly and may one day cease to be made.

The Future of Photo Books

It seems I'm not the only person concerned about what will happen to photo-book publishing in the future? The good folks over at, Resolve, LIVE BOOKS BLOG, have started an online collaboration that looks at the future of the photobook.

Pop in add your 2¢

From where I sit, there will be online publications such as cod magazine, who most likely will exist as pure online entities. Publicationss like, RMIT's second nature, will offer both online and hardcopy, as I will with several of my own future projects, I already have two e-books available for download.

Polaroid Is Not Dead

Polapremium, sends out a weekly e-mail. This week's really caught my eye. In particular, this line;

In order to shorten the waiting period until the premiere of our new Impossible film,

The impossible film project has been burbling along now quite nicely for some time, in an attempt to resurrect film for vintage Polaroid cameras, now we finally have a a timeframe to look forward to. Hurry up please Polaroid project , I know many many folks here in Oz, who are very keen to buy some film.

Why Not in Australia?

Recently found this site via a e-mail, and noticed it was geared towards, the US, the UK and Europe only? Is there no interest in the Australian or Asian art market?

Is there not enough entrepernurail interest to try and set up something similar, and yes I'm aware of Red Bubble, but this site focuses on fine art prints, Red Bubble covers all manner of visual arts.

EYE BUY ART | EyeBuyArt.com
Uploaded with plasq's Skitch!

A Quotation

Chatting with a peer in Darwin who has just completed their Honours Year, made me dig up my own Masters project, which I completed in 2002. At the end of the project is a series of notes I added post production, here's one I'd like to share.

“A fine print is the culmination of a complex sequence which begins with the recognition of the visual event. To produce such a print, the photographer must make a negative that is properly exposed in relation to the pre-visualised image...This sense of fine, almost unseen, detail and clarity allows the viewer to experience subtle differences in reality. Each viewer brings to the photograph their own personal sensitivities and the “fine print” allows the viewer to more easily intuit the connections existing between the viewer, the photographer and the photograph”
Gordon Hutchins
pg 7
“The Book of Pyro “
Bitter Dog Press
1992

Yet Another Self Published Photography Magazine

Publication - Produced by street photographers for street photographers

[Produced in London, UK by Nick Turpin Publishing
  • Aims to publish the best Street Photography we can find
  • Consists of an illustrated color booklet of essays and articles accompanied by twenty-two unbound prints
  • Has a different theme for each edition
  • Is open to suggestions and submissions
  • Is self financing and contains no advertising, your purchase contributes directly to the next edition
Publication - Produced by street photographers for street photographers]

It will be interesting to see how this pans out, I like the idea of financing the publication through the photographers buying the mag themselves.

16 October 2009 – 4 April 2010
Photography Gallery, Level 3
Free entry

[In 1967, the NGV established the first separate curatorial Department of Photography in an Australian art gallery and since that time we have delivered a continuous program of exhibitions and publications featuring the rich history of photography. The heart of our activities is based on the permanent collection which now numbers over 15,000 photographs, of which 3,000 works are by international artists. This year marks the 40th anniversary of our first acquisitions to the collection and, as such, it is timely to ‘re-view’ what has been achieved. National Gallery of Victoria]

read on...

I will be visiting this exhibition over the coming months I hope to use it for some inspiration in at least blogging, we shall see.

Pioneers

Revisiting a favourite bookshop, in Daylesford, I recently returned with several gems of books. Jo Spence's Autobiographical treatise on herself and her photography [Putting Myself in the Picture: A Political, Personal and Photographic Autobiography], and 1999 exhibition catalogue of William Wegman's work.

While I have yet to pick up the Jo Spence book, my last reading would have been whilst at University, I did have a read of the Wegman catalogue. I was very surprised to read that he began his creative career as a painter sculptor and conceptual/experimental artist. Wegman picked up photography out of convenience, to document his art work, while also experimenting with video. His art works, in the early days were fleeting and ephemeral, thus photography proved the work existed.

Slowly his attention shifted to the way images could be made that questioned the nature of the document created, till eventually all his work became photographic while still proudly displaying his surreal and conceptual roots. The work featured in the catalogue is at times funny, and others deadly serious. His dogs feature only briefly towards the end of the catalogue. The time this work was being made? In the 1970's.

It's fortuitous or perhaps, disastrous that the 2 books surfaced AFTER I submitted some work for publication in 2nd Nature, published by RMIT. As being able to refer back to these early pioneers of 'documentary photography' would have helped bolster my argument about the my use of photography, with my mobile phone, in this day and age of wireless networks and mobile computing.

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11  

Tags

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.