Results tagged “digital”

Meanwhile; elsewhere on the web.

AustralianPolicyOnline.jpg

I have had an image published by the online magazine, called Australian Policy online.

It has been used using my creative commons licence, which I've always been an advocate of.

APO describes itself so:-

APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. As well as research, the site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focused on the policy issues facing Australia.

I am honoured and appreciative that this organisation has used my image, especially as they have honoured its creative licence

The image is used in an article entitled, Australia in the digital economy: the shift to the online environment, and can be read on their website, under the section Creative & Digital.

Organising My Archives

archive lablels

Getting organised for the collection of Broadcast Media, using my eyeTV, and g5, I decided my archived CDs needed re-organising, it turns out I've been using a digital camera of some shape or form since 1999, 10 years folks, 10 years! I've been scanning longer of course, but as negatives, they need not be archived via CD. If you count 1998 as my start year in serious photography, this means over half of my time making images have been spent using a digital camera!

Of course 1/2 way though 2008, I got my 'DET leased' laptop that actually has a DVD burner, so that'll slow things down.

Not sure where external drives are going to fit into the equation, nor 'the cloud'.

Lightroom

As part of my ongoing investigations regarding professional image editing software, and as a PD commitment, I've been working with Lightroom over the holidays, and let me say as a photographic editing tool it is very good. A no nonsense digital darkroom, I'm still not convinced however that the Asset management side of things is going to work as well as it could? Because I've been using Expression Media for so long now, we'll see, for the time being I guess I'll have to use both, systems to compare, thank god hard disks are so cheap these days.

These first four of five screens, will be a great class starter this year.

Smart Panel
Smart Panel2
Smart Panel4
Uploaded with plasq's Skitch!

Everything a digital photographer could need is here, with no extra bells and whistles to slow down the learning process or the workflow.

Is this the answer to my digital media search?

The software, which is free and available for download at www.boxee.tv, works on Mac and Linux computers, and on Apple's set-top box, Apple TV. A version of Boxee for Windows PCs is being tested among a limited group of users.

Good Advice

This last line in an article in the Age online newspaper about digital photography and memories is a classic, and food for thought!

DON'T DITCH THE OLD-FASHIONED PHOTO ALBUM
Make a habit of regularly printing and saving your favourite pictures in a photo album. Kids will love pulling it out and looking through it.

Colour to Black & White?

In camera, or post-production?

Recently in a flickr discussion forum, the issues of in-camera processing came up. LotF, the photographer in question, was disappointed at the results his new camera was producing, with in-camera b & w conversions, compared to an older camera. Some argued that it was the camera, or maybe the camera's software. Others also wondered out loud about the pro and cons of in camera conversion and post production conversion.

I am a fan of being aware of and able to control outcomes to meet my expectations, this is something any software that is fully automatic will lock the user out of entirely. Therefore I tend to avoid in-camera processing, besides it's almost impossible to make good judgments on a screen that small.

So, for me the only way to convert is in post-production. I did however conduct a small simple test, one shot as usual and then the same shot with the camera set to b&w*

I used Photoshop's black and white conversion on the default settings. image>mode>black & whiteThe results indicated to me that post was indeed better. Subtle but better. [The in-camera shot for comparison.] The highlights were over-exposed, the shadows and mid-tones were ok though, I guess if you had the software to run a jpeg through a raw conversion tool, you could fix up some of the problem areas and blend them together.

original file converted post exposure

This in camera processed shot, has blown highlights and poor mid tone separation, the contrast seems to high too for my liking.


in camera conversion

Post processed has more values to work with, the shadows reading #3, are little empty for my liking though, easy fixed with some tweaking in Photoshop.


*This has all been done using phone cameras for speed and convenience.

Photoshop Layers 4

Layer Masks, one of my favourite tricks is to duplicate a layer, make some changes to it, whether it be colour contrast b&w, or some other effect I want to, apply to the image then add a layer mask and brush in any differences I want to see applied to the image.

Using a black and white image on top of the other is one of the most common, but intensifying colour using curves or levels is one of my favourites. Again this approach in non-destructive, and infinitely un-doable, while the layers are unflattened.

Lastly the Text Layer, which is relatively self explanatory, I hope? Handy for adding a copyright watermark to your image I guess?

Photoshop Layers 3

Today, I'm going to look breifly at how I use adjustment layers.

From Photoshop's help files:-

An adjustment layer applies color and tonal adjustments to your image without permanently changing pixel values. For example, rather than making a Levels or Curves adjustment directly to your image, you can create a Levels or Curves adjustment layer. The color and tone adjustments are stored in the adjustment layer and apply to all the layers below it. You can discard your changes and restore the original image at any time.

As a small aside you can now access an extensive set of help files on the web directly from the help applicaiton in photoshop.

The key issue here for me is the ability to make and adjustment to say colour balance density or saturation of an image and then brush through the mask to locally adjust the image to best suit my ideas and intentions in photograph.

This approach offers a degree of control unheard of in the history of colour photography. Combined with a desktop inkjet printer like the Epson R2400, I now have a complete home colour darkroom. And of course, again, no pixels are destroyed in the process.

adjustment layers

Photoshop Layers 2

Yesterday, I talked about 4 kinds of layers. The first in my list was just a Layer, an empty one. As an artist with a training in wet darkroom processes and the production of photographic prints as objects, I actually have little use for many of photoshop's features, this layer does however have a fantastic use. If I fill it with 50% grey, and change it's blending mode to soft-light, this enables me to burn & dodge an image in a NON-DESTRUCTIVE manner as I would in a wet darkroom.

I've never quite understood HOW¶ this works, but it's power, simplicity elegance, and infinite un-doability makes it a must have trick in my bag of photographic darkroom tricks.

Then using either a) a paintbrush and black or white at low opacities, or the burning & dodging tools again at low opacities, in photoshop you can totally re-map the tonality of your image shifting emphasis on areas in a way that painters have understood for 100's of years.

The real beauty of this is if applied subtly there will be no obvious artefacts creeping into your image and even if they do, they can be wound back by using the opposite colour to change, not to mention that no pixels are edited directly in the image thereby non are destroyed and no issues such as banding creep into you prints†.

colour picker 50%
¶Many of the blending modes remain a mystery to me, and as photographic tools there are only really a couple that I would use regularly, this being one of them.
† All of these articles will be written from a paper output approach, as when producing screen based work I rarely make modifications to my images, due to the great unknown which is monitor calibration, and monitor colour spaces.

Processing Matrix

Here's a Downloadable pdf of the processing matrix, that may be easier to read.

Photographic Processing Matrix

Sometime back, I mentioned, I was thinking about a processing matrix of sorts, well here it is, now I need to make a better looking pdf version

Photographic Workflow Matrix

Shoot Process Proof Print/Output  
Task/Digital Exposure, be accurate, avoid under exposing shadows. Download from camera. Process to format suitable for future reference. Colour correct. Add colour Profile. Archive to CD/DVD. Add/Import to catalogue program. Print out hardcopy if needed.‡ Send to Print bureau for output as either Lambda or Pegasus print, or inkjet or print in-house using inkjet printer, or publish to the web. Infinte control available in digital tools such as Photoshop
Task/Analogue Neg film expose for the shadows, usually over. Positive Film expose for the highlights.¶ B&W Neg Film, process for the highlights.†
Colour Neg process. Positive film Process.
B&W make proof sheet colour neg, get machine proofs. Positive, view on light box. File negatives and proofs away for future reference. B&W, make work print. †Colour neg, make print, some local burning and dodging possible. Finished B&W prints can take as long to produce as the skills of the printer allow.
           
Software/Digital Raw Files
jpeg files
5 megapixels plus
Download from camera.
Process to format suitable for future reference. Colour correct. Add colour Profile.
Archive to CD/DVD. Add/Import to catalogue program. Print out hardcopy if needed. Send to Print bureau for output as either Lambda or Pegasus print, or inkjet or print in-house using inkjet printer, or publish to the web.  
Software/Analogue Choose a format and film type to suit the task at hand, eg 35mm for street photography, 5x4 and larger for landscape or product photography and so on. Choice of film developer, determines time temperature and agitation method, which in turn affect reults like contrast and grain. B&W requires minimum time maximum black. Labs produce colour proofs, using machinery with associated costs, and time. Expose for the highlights change filters for the shadows, then make local adjustments in darkroom, B&W only. No global contrast control, local contrast control in Type C is not impossible but technically difficult Finished B&W prints can take as long to produce as the skills of the printer allow.
  ¶ Remember the trade offs.    
    †The choices here, are exhaustive, it is even possible to make your own papers, and chemicals.
      ‡To an extent many packages will do this task sufficiently, such as Adobe Bridge, but iView Media Pro, frees up choices in terms of physical media and it’s location.

Bureaucratic Overload

It's that time of year where contemplating photography takes a back seat over other issues, like results and forward planning. I have however been thinking about, a matrix of sorts that shows the similarities between Digital photography processing and Analogue Photography processing.

Someone Else Appreciates Toy Cameras

We are not alone, so do the writers at Luminous Landscape dot com.

Serendipity II

IMG 1543_paddock

The Holga "look" coming from the this camera is amazing.

Serendipity

IMG 1537_boomgates

The opportunities keep rolling in with my VistaQuest 1005.

1

Tags

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.